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hi my name is kayla and this is a sideblog for archiving sj posts/resources, writing help, masterposts, and more, for easier access and for when I don't want to clutter up my main blog. i would prefer if you did not follow this blog; thank you.
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“If you blame Native American communities for their poverty, remember that the entire continent was stolen from them.
If you blame Black American communities for their relative poverty, remember that Black Americans were stolen from a continent, trafficked, and enslaved for nearly 300 years.
Tell me again about how your family ‘started from nothing’ when they immigrated. Didn’t they start from whiteness? Seems like a pretty good start.
The American Dream required dual genocides, but tell me again about fairness and equal opportunity. Tell me about democracy, modeled after the Iroquois Confederacy. Tell me your proud heritage, and I will show you the violence that made it so.”
— (via nativnuance)
By

via Kim Katrin Crosby 

Keynote Speaker for LGBTQ History Month at Dartmouth, on September 30, 2013 

https://www.facebook.com/kim.k.crosby

(via biggreenmicroaggressions)

(via feministsociology)

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Look, if posing naked were empowering, then the rich men who run the world would be lining up for it. We would be awash in naked dick shots of Warren Buffet and Bill Gates and Barack Obama; magazines would be filled with male politicians and financiers and moguls with their bits hanging out. Softly lit, perhaps; head coyly tilted, bunny tail on the ass. Power.
By http://www.reclusiveleftist.com (via endporn)

(via saotome-michi)

drag0n-r0ad:

 

directorlazard:

rapeculturerealities:

fuckyeahifightlikeagirl:

sweetsugaryshock:

beben-eleben:

For future reference.

Thank you.

For those who would ever need it. -C

reblogging here because i can see this being relevant to anyone who’s ever tried to get out of an abusive relationship

Reblogging because that last comment made me reread the whole thing in a new light and realize this could be vital information. So, putting it out there for everyone, and hoping no one ever really needs it.

(via endquestionmark)

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Writing Side Characters: Thoughts

fuckyourwritinghabits:

Hey Writing Habits, do you have any tips or links for writing side characters? Keeping the little guys as interesting as the big ones, as it were?

Your side characters have their own backgrounds. Fleshing those out will help you a lot in figuring out what they can do and when. Even if you end up with thirty pages of notes that will never see the light of day - or more! - getting to know them will help you a lot in making them interesting.

Your side characters are not aware they are side characters. Everybody else is starring in their story. They’re not going to drop everything just to be there in time to provide a key plot point or helpful hint. They have to behave naturally, and within their own interests.

What we don’t know can be just as interesting as what we do. Having some mysteries remain about your side characters can make them just as memorable as the main ones. Why didn’t Shelly cry at her mom’s funeral? Why was the secretary willing to risk her job to help the detective? Hinting at their motives - or leaving characters wondering at them - can help make them more real.

That said, giving them motives is super important. Shortcuts and stock characters leave much to be desired. As a writer, you can do better than that. The girl who gets with the guy at the end is just that, a stock character. The girl who gets with the guy at the end because they really like each other or because of Some Other Reason just got more interesting.

Hope these help!

(Source: fixyourwritinghabits, via writeworld)

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voicesofreasons said: Hey I wanted to know if you had any in depth or helpful information about writing a soulmate au?

clevergirlhelps:

Sure! I’ve actually had a lot of thoughts about soulmates recently, so this is a good opportunity. My basic feeling about soulmate stories is that they shouldn’t be as light, fluffy, and easy as they often are. The first reason is because conflict generates interest (which is why true utopias are so boring to read about) and the second reason is because life is hard. So here are some tips…

  • Do not stop their development as a couple. Their time together will change the nature of their relationship. Put the realization towards the beginning or middle of the story so you can explore how being together causes them to see the world differently.
  • Open the attachment to other forms of love. For example, squishes and friendship. Also make the attachment open to more than two individuals in the case of polyamory or a group of really close friends or something.
  • Let the couple have differences. It seems that a lot of soulmate couples just click within their first few dates and it’s all sunshine and rainbows from thereon out. You can still fight with someone and love them. You can have long-standing disagreements with someone (and not just those cutesy disagreements like who saw who first) and still love them. I know a couple that can’t stand each other during election season. After the election is over, they get back together like nothing happened. Even though they’re on different sides of the political spectrum, their love and mutual interests on other issues overcomes politics.
  • Don’t cure things with soulmates. Finding your soulmate should not cure things like addiction, self destructive behavior, or mental illness. It should not instantly iron out personality flaws. While a soulmate can be part of the healing process, they should not be the sole cause of their partner’s recovery.
  • Let people have relationships outside their soulmates. People don’t need to wait until they meet their soulmate to have meaningful relationships or do things you’re supposed to “save until marriage”. Even in a soulmate world, you should be able to go on dates with non-soulmates and have one night stands with other people. At the very least, I’m sure people want to figure out this dating nonsense before they try anything with their soulmate.
  • What about missing soulmates? Your soulmate could die young, fall in love with someone else, or seem utterly disappointing. Your soulmate could be a farmer in the American Midwest while you are a herder in rural Mongolia. Your soulmate could have been born in the 1800s. You could give up waiting for your soulmate and choose someone else who you are still really happy with.    
  • Finally. I’ve noticed that a lot of soulmate AU ideas on Tumblr involve your soulmate’s name somewhere on your body or a clock on your wrist counting down the minutes until you met them or some other clue as to when you will meet The One. Break that system.

writtenbymadeline:

A tool to use for find Synonyms: Synonym Finder.

This is a great, unique little tool I found by browsing for writing resources. It’s name speaks for itself: it’s a synonym finder.

The site is clean cut, has soothing colors, and to-the point results for any word you look up.

For example, when I look up the word “romance,” I get this:

Synonyms: romance, romanticism
Definition: an exciting and mysterious quality (as of a heroic time or adventure)

Hypernyms: quality
Definition: an essential and distinguishing attribute of something or someone
Usage: the quality of mercy is not strained—Shakespeare”

I had no idea what a “hypernym” is. Apparently it’s a word with a more general meaning that a more specific word fall under. Like, color is a hypernym for green.

On the right corner there’s a button to make graphs! So you can trace each synonym from it’s root word, and see how far the other synonyms connect in comparison to others.

I really like it, so I’m going to definitely bookmark it on my writing tools list.

(via thewritingcafe)

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Ratchet is a racialized term. So is ghetto. So is thug. So is welfare queen. Someone does not have to EXPLICITLY say the word “black” in order for something to be racist against black people. Speaking in flagrantly racist terms is one of the least sophisticated manifestations of racism today.
By TemperedFury on Philip DeFranco’s, creator of the YouTube channel Philly D, use of racialized language.  (via knowledgeequalsblackpower)

(Source: america-wakiewakie, via glowcloud)

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18 Things White People Should Know/Do Before Discussing Racism

(Source: chescaleigh, via feministsociology)

escranesque:

Kelly Foreman, “Bad Girls Confined: Okuni, Geisha, and the Negotiation of Female Performance Space,” in Bad Girls of Japan, Jan Bardsley and Laura Miller, eds., Houndmills, Balsingstoke, Hampshire ; New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2005.
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The ad was in a women’s magazine and if I remember correctly, was for a perfume. It featured a white woman lying in bed with a black man. The man’s shirtless back was to the viewer, making only his taut, muscular form and powerful-looking arms and shoulders visible. He was faceless, unidentified. The woman looked sultrily at us from over his mysterious form, satisfaction writ large over her features. She had partaken of whatever delights this man had to offer and was smugly, luxuriantly basking in the afterglow.

The ad copy was, “Take a walk on the wild side.”

My teacher used the ad as an example of how marketers can use certain words and images to convey large amounts of information subtly and effectively. A white woman having sex with a black man? How risqué. The implication: be a little like that woman. Spray on that perfume and feel like the kind of girl who has sex with faceless, muscular black men in ritzy hotel rooms because it’s an adventure, a thrill, a risk, something illicitly pleasurable.

These are the semiotics of race. This is why columnists will trip over themselves not to call Lupita Nyong’o or Angela Basset “beautiful”, choosing instead to use terms that call to mind a kind of savage, animalistic magnetism: fierce, striking, edgy, eye-catching. Words like “pretty” and “beautiful” and “cute” are for white women whose bodies and sexualities are not seen as wild, animal, or untamed. Black men are hulking, threatening, thuggish; white men are charming, sexy heartthrobs with hearts of gold. Brown women are exotic, with their “honey-coloured” skin and their “mystical”, “enchanting” beauty, unlike their white counterparts, who are held up as not only ideal, but knowable and safe. White people are beautiful; non-white people are dangerous.

By

"The Semiotics of Race, or: Walks on the Wild Side"

by Aaminah Khan (via Black Girl Dangerous)

(Source: sunandimension, via tentakrule)

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