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hi my name is kayla and this is a sideblog for archiving sj posts/resources, writing help, masterposts, and more, for easier access and for when I don't want to clutter up my main blog.
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NATIVES READ TOO

the-yaadihla-girls:

NATIVES READ TOO

Browsing the internet, found some free PDFs to read:

You have here, writings that detail Indigenous topics covering or in the style of: manifestos, creative writings, political, cultural, “feminist”, environment/ecosystems, and Natural Law. 

Enjoy the readings!

(via saotome-michi)

thewritingcafe:


Part I: Creating a Religion
Part II: Religious Hierarchies
Part III: Pantheons, Deities, Mythologies, etc.
BONUS: Ceremonies (birth, death, naming, sacrificing, rites of passage)
This is similar to Part III, but more specific on a single deity.
BASICS
What is a deity?

A deity is a divine or supernatural being that meets one or more of the following:
Is worshiped by a population
Is given attributes and associations
Is recognized as a divine being
They are often referred to as gods and goddesses.

Your religion does not need deities.
TYPE OF DEITY
You can have different groups of deities within a pantheon of deities. These groups can be separated however you want. Perhaps one group is for all the water deities (rain, storms, fresh water, salt water, waterfalls, snow, ice, etc.) or maybe the deities are separated by hierarchy.
What you do with these groups is up to you. Deities within one group might share similarities in their appearance or behavior, or each group might have a different following of worshipers, or each group might represent something as a whole (an animal or a season, for example).
Read More
1802

Polyamory for Writers

aithne:

Every so often, the cry goes up: “Fewer love triangles and more threesomes!” But what if you’re a writer who wants to write some polyamorous relationships, but you’re not sure where to start?

This article is here to help.

Please note that this is not a guide about how to be in a polyamorous relationship. That ground has been covered by other people in more depth and detail than I will ever be able to manage. (I have some good articles for you to read at the end of this piece, should you be looking for that.) This is a quick guide about writing polyamorous characters, how poly relationships work, and special concerns writers need to watch out for. This is not a comprehensive post, but it should give you a place to start.

(As for why I wrote this: I am a writer who has identified as poly for her entire adult life, and have been in a number of different varieties of poly relationships over the years, including a committed triad. I have a lot of experience with poly relationships—including messing them up. I figured that if anyone’s going to write something like this, it’s going to be me.)

Ready to go?  The good stuff is under the cut.

Read More

(via revolutionariess)

9678

Dear internet,

trailofdesire:

magpieandwhale:

trailofdesire:

emilysidhe:

ambienne:

Please give me all the advice you have on writing cover letters. Like, the closer you can get to literally just writing a cover letter for me, the better. Ok bye.

This is how I did the one for my librarian position.  I hope it helps.

Dear Person Hiring for this Job,

I am writing to ask you to consider me for X position.  This is a paragraph about why I want to do X position in general.  It includes at least one personal detail and at least one job skill I consider a particular strength.  It argues that I am passionate about this career.  It is not long.

I have had the opportunity to gain experience in this job by - paragraph about my work or study experience.  It should go from most recent experience back.  Include some details about your responsibilities/achievements in your most recent or most important positions.  If you have mostly study experience, give more detail about what exactly you studied.  If you shadowed people, mention that.  If your work experience is largely unrelated, try to shoehorn some of it in (e.g. I gained experience working with people by).  You can supplement with relevant hobbies.  (But if you do have recent, relevant work experience, you should largely be detailing that.  Only embroider the other stuff if you need to flesh it out.)  This should be the longest paragraph.

I hope you will consider allowing me to do X thing at your company.  This is a few sentences about why I want to work at your company in particular and what I think I could bring.  Try to mention at least one detail from the company website, so they know you visited it.  This is a short paragraph that parallels the first one.

Thank you very much for your time and attention.

Sincerely,

Person You Would Be a Fool Not to At Least Interview

oh my god thank you this is relevant to current interests

Two other points, to challenge what’s being said above a little:

1) Remember that the person reading this cover letter wants to know how you can contribute to the company. Not how excited you are about the position: it’s all about what they gain. Try framing the whole thing in that sense — “You would gain my X awesome skill that would help you Y with your mission.” “Here’s why I’m awesome and a great fit for making your company go better.”

2) At the end, ask for the interview. “I am available at PHONE NUMBER at your convenience. I look forward to speaking with you about this great opportunity soon.” Maybe even say you’ll be following up at a specific time and date. Ask for the job. People respond to that, and it’s a good way to fake confidence until you make it. Ask for the job.

Okay, three points. People reading cover letters get SO BORED going through them. Think about starting off with a story that relates to why you’re interested in the job, or that demonstrates a skill or a strong interest that would make you a good candidate. Be memorable — people remember stories, even (maybe especially) very little ones.

*hoards advice*

(via thewritingcafe)

womenrockscience:

apersnicketylemon:

nothatsstupid:

hayleystarkftw:

(source)

Makes me want to fucking cry

But feminism isn’t important and is something none of us should care about. Right?

Wow, I love it when people use science to bust inequalities. We’ve got a long way to go.

(via fannypackfeminism)

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